Eating Healthy Really Can Prevent Cancer

Did you know that eating a healthy, balanced diet is an important way to protect yourself from cancer? Putting the right kinds of food into your body can provide you with the vitamins, minerals, and nutrients to keep you healthy and strong. To help build your defense against cancer, focus on eating some of these cancer-fighting foods that may already be in your kitchen.

Foods That Help Fight Cancer

The National Cancer Institute does not recommend any dietary supplement for the prevention or treatment of cancer. However these foods have shown potential for reducing the risk of developing cancer due to their cancer-fighting properties.

Leafy Green Vegetables

Leafy green vegetables are loaded with vitamins, minerals, and enzymes, while remaining very low in calories, sodium, and fat. Greens such as spinach, kale, collard greens, swiss chard, leaf lettuce, and romaine lettuce, are known to combat a variety of cancers including skin cancer, breast cancer, stomach cancer, and breast cancer. Because they are also rich in carotenoids, the plant pigments that act as antioxidants in the body, leafy greens are also thought to be good at battling cancers of the mouth, pharynx, and larynx.

Cruciferous Vegetables

Cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, brussels sprouts, radishes, and even wasabi, contain fiber, folate and vitamins C, E, and K. They also get their strong smell and bitter flavor from substances known as glucosinolates, which are sulfur-containing chemicals. Adding vegetables like these to your diet can help boost your body’s protective enzymes and flush out cancer-causing chemicals.

Cruciferous veggies are considered to be most useful in reducing the risk of developing bladder cancer, stomach cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, prostate, skin cancer, and breast cancer.

Garlic

Garlic is a staple ingredient that has been used for both culinary and medicinal purposes around the world. Protective effects from garlic may arise from its antibacterial properties or from its ability to block the formation of cancer-causing substances, enhance DNA repair, reduce cell proliferation, or induce cell death. Garlic is most useful in fighting against breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, esophageal cancer, and stomach cancer.

Most people take garlic in the form of a supplement rather than eating bulbs of garlic. The World Health Organization’s (WHO) guidelines for general health promotion for adults is one of the following:

  • a daily dose of 2 to 5 g of fresh garlic (approximately one clove)
  • 0.4 to 1.2 g of dried garlic powder
  • 2 to 5 mg of garlic oil
  • 300 to 1,000 mg of garlic extract
  • or other formulations that are equal to 2 to 5 mg of allicin

Tomatoes

While tomatoes are an excellent source of vitamins C and A, it’s the lycopene, the pigment that gives red tomatoes their color, that has been studied for its cancer-fighting effects. Antioxidants, such as lycopene, destroy damaging free radicals, which can attach your your cells and hurt your immune system. Although the evidence suggests that foods containing lycopene, including tomatoes, likely offer cancer protection, the American Institute for Cancer Research stresses the importance of eating a variety of plant foods. No single food can effectively lower cancer risk, so it is important to eat a variety of healthy foods so you can gain the most benefit in fighting cancer.

Lycopene in tomatoes is believe to be most helpful in fighting endometrial cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer and breast cancer.

Berries

Raspberries, blackberries, strawberries, blueberries, and berries of every color are good sources of vitamin C and fiber. They are also rich in antioxidants and ellagic acid, which help block free radicals and deactivate specific carcinogens (cancer causing agents) that can lead to cancer growth. Berries have been found to be useful in fighting colorectal cancer, esophageal cancer, skin cancer, and oral cancer.

These are just a handful of foods that will help you maintain an overall healthy diet which is recommended to fight cancer. To learn more about what foods make for healthy choices, you can visit the American Cancer Society’s Basic Ingredients for a Healthy Kitchen. Consume all things in moderation, even healthy foods, and include a wide variety of healthy foods in your daily intake, not just those listed here.

Foods That Can Cause Cancer

Animal Fats

Not all meats and dairy products are bad for you, however, the ones that contain saturated fats can be. Consider choosing low-fat versions of meats and cheeses, and steer clear of processed meats whenever you can which tend to be higher in fat, nitrates and other preservatives.

Alcohol

The less alcohol you drink, the lower the risk of cancer. It doesn’t matter whether it’s beer, wine, or spirits–too much alcohol can impair your body’s ability to fight disease. The National Cancer Institute recommends that women have no more than one drink per day and men have no more than two drinks per day. Excessive alcohol consumption can put you at an increased risk of mouth cancer, esophagus cancer, breast cancer, and liver cancer.

Charred Meats

When high-temperature methods, such as grilling, are used to cook meats like beef, pork, fish, and poultry, certain DNA-damaging chemicals, called HCAs and PAHs can form. Although it is still unclear whether such exposure causes cancer in humans, the cancer that it has been found to cause in animals indicates that it may be best to avoid foods that are highly charred (black from heat exposure).

There are many other foods that researchers are still studying to determine whether they may contribute to the development of cancer or help reduce your risk of cancer. If you have questions regarding how to prevent cancer, it’s best to consult your doctor. The team at Maryland Oncology Hematology is always ready to help patients find healthy food options they can enjoy both now and after cancer treatment. For more information, contact us, or visit us at one of our 12 locations including Annapolis,  Bethesda, Brandywine, Clinton, Columbia, Frederick, Lanham, Laurel, Mt. Airy, Rockville at Aquilino Cancer Center and Silver Spring at White Oak Cancer Center.

For more information on cancer prevention you can visit the following blogs:

Sources:

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Maryland Oncology Hematology Welcomes Colette Magnant, MD, FACS to Their Expanding Breast Surgical Oncology Team

Dr. Magnant joins Dr. Surupa Sen Gupta at their Rockville Division to offer the community advanced surgical care with the latest breast preservation techniques.

Maryland Oncology Hematology  (MOH), the largest independent oncology practice in Maryland and a member of The US Oncology Network, is proud to announce that Dr. Colette Magnant, MD, FACS is joining its Rockville division.

Dr. Magnant has been treating breast cancer for over 34 years and has established herself as one of the premier breast cancer surgeons in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area.  With her extensive training and wealth of experience, she provides her patients with a superior understanding of breast cancer biology, as well as compassionate state of the art breast preservation procedures, and advanced surgical techniques. She will be joining Dr. Surupa Sen Gupta to expand our breast surgical oncology services at our Rockville division, and together they, along with our expert and experienced medical oncologists, will anchor our comprehensive breast cancer program in the Rockville division.

‘We’re thrilled to welcome Dr. Magnant  to our experienced breast surgical team. Her stellar reputation as a top breast surgeon is well-deserved and we are fortunate that she has decided to bring her skills to our practice and to our community.  She shares our vision of providing state-of-the-art multidisciplinary cancer care, and we are delighted to have her join in our expansion said George Sotos MD, Managing Partner, Rockville Division. ‘With her focus and strong surgical experience in breast cancer treatment, Dr. Magnant is a welcome addition to our team as we dedicate our practice to delivering the very best in comprehensive and integrated care to our breast cancer patients.

Dr. Magnant is board certified in general surgery, specializing in advanced breast surgery techniques, including skin and nipple-sparing mastectomies and minimally invasive breast conserving surgeries. After earning her medical degree from the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond, Dr. Magnant completed her general surgery internship at Indiana University Medical Center and her residency at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, DC. She is most recently the past director of the Sullivan Center for Breast Health at Sibley Hospital, as well as an assistant professor at John Hopkins University. In addition to teaching, Dr. Magnant has made numerous media appearances and delivered dozens of university lectures.

‘I’m proud to work alongside the dynamic team at Maryland Oncology Hematology, said Dr. Magnant. ‘We’re dedicated to delivering compassionate and comprehensive breast health services to the surrounding community, allowing our patients to receive the best of care, close to home.

Dr. Magnant will be joining Dr. Sen Gupta who is board certified in general surgery, fellowship trained in breast surgical oncology, and specializes in minimally invasive breast-conserving surgeries.

Dr. Magnant will start seeing patients at MOH’s Rockville office on April 1st. Appointments are available for newly referred patients to provide a high level of support and easy access to care. Please call 301.424.6231 to make an appointment.

About Maryland Oncology Hematology

Maryland Oncology Hematology (MOH) is the largest independent oncology practice in the state of Maryland, with more than 45 practicing clinicians devoted exclusively to providing comprehensive, compassionate, and high-quality cancer care. MOH specializes in medical, gynecologic, hematology, cancer genetic risk assessment, clinical trials and research, and patient ancillary programs. MOH believes it is beneficial to provide cancer therapies in a community setting, close to patients’ homes and support systems. The physicians are supported by a talented clinical team sensitive to the needs of cancer patients and their caregivers. For more information, visit MarylandOncology.com.

About US Oncology Network

Maryland Oncology Hematology is a practice in The US Oncology Network  (The Network). This collaboration unites the practice with more than 1,380 independent physicians dedicated to delivering value-based, integrated care to patients — close to home. Through The Network, these independent doctors come together to form a community of shared expertise and resources dedicated to advancing local cancer care and to delivering better patient outcomes. The Network is supported by McKesson Corporation , whose coordinated resources and infrastructure allow doctors in The Network to focus on the health of their patients, while McKesson focuses on the health of their practices. MOH also participates in clinical trials through US Oncology Research, which has played a role in more than 100 FDA-approved cancer therapies.

 

Media Contact
Company Name: Maryland Oncology Hematology
Contact Person: Mark W Lamplugh Jr
Email: Send Email
Phone: 5617629729
Country: United States
Website: https://mdoncology.wpengine.com

 

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The Rise of Colorectal Cancer in Young Adults

A study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute  made headlines for its startling and mysterious conclusion: The incidence of colorectal cancer in young adults has increased sharply in generations born after 1950. Individuals born in the 1990s (currently age 18 to 27) are twice as likely to develop colon cancer and four times as likely to develop rectal cancer than individuals born in the 1950s were at those ages.

Why is this type of cancer suddenly on the rise in younger adults? No one knows for certain. Researchers suspect changes in diet, more sedentary lifestyles, and obesity could be contributing factors. Another theory is that cancers are simply being detected much earlier than in past decades.

What Is Colorectal Cancer?

Colorectal cancer refers to cancer that begins in the colon or rectum, which together make up the large intestine. Sometimes they are referred to individually as colon cancer or rectal cancer. Most colorectal cancers begin with a polyp that develops on the inner lining of the colon or rectum. The two primary types of polyps are adenomas, which are most likely to become cancer, and hyperplastic and inflammatory polyps, which are more common but far less likely to become cancerous.

Polyps are common in people age 50 and older. Most aren’t cancerous. If a polyp does become cancerous, cancer cells can eventually spread to the wall of the colon or rectum. From there, they can spread to the blood or lymph vessels of the colon or rectum and eventually spread to lymph nodes and metastasize throughout the body.

Colorectal Cancer: Signs and Symptoms

As with many cancers, colorectal cancers sometimes occur with minimal — or no — symptoms. More often than not, though, this cancer is associated with telltale signs. If you know what to watch for, you’ll know if and when it’s time to schedule a colorectal screening to rule out cancer. If you develop any of the following symptoms, consult your doctor right away. It’s better to be safe than sorry!

Any indication of blood on or in the stool.
Rectal bleeding.
Unexplained anemia.
Cramps, gas or unusual stomach pain that persists.
Unexplained weight loss.
Vomiting.
Fatigue.
Constipation, diarrhea, bowel incontinence or other unusual bowel habits.
Feeling that your bowel isn’t emptying completely.

How to Reduce Your Risk of Developing Colorectal Cancer

According to the American Cancer Society, there is no way to definitively prevent colon cancer — or most cancers, for that matter. Some of the main risk factors for developing colorectal cancer — family history, advanced age and history of inflammatory bowel disease — aren’t within your control.

Others risk factors are within your control. Doctors recommend taking the following steps to reduce your risks:

Maintaining a healthy weight and avoiding excess weight around your midsection.
Participating in regular moderate exercise.
Increasing your intake of fruits and vegetables and limiting red and processed meats.
Avoiding excess alcohol consumption.
Quitting smoking.

Screening Is The Most Powerful Preventive Tool

Arguably, the most effective way to reduce the likelihood that you’ll develop colorectal cancer is to undergo regular colorectal cancer screening to detect cancerous or precancerous cells in the absence of other symptoms.

It takes about a decade for precancerous cells to form polyps. Screenings can detect precancerous polyps, so they can be removed before they become cancerous, and can detect cancerous polyps early when the cancer is curable.

Colorectal screening methods include fecal blood tests and colonoscopy. During a colonoscopy, a flexible tube with a viewing lens and tissue removal tool is inserted into the colon. A physician checks the colon lining for growths and can remove any abnormal growths detected.

Current guidelines recommend that most individuals consider a screening colonoscopy at age 50 — earlier for those with a family history of the disease talk to your physician about the best choice for your situation.

Sources:


https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/djw322
http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/02/28/517563769/why-are-more-young-americans-getting-colon-cancer
http://www.webmd.com/colorectal-cancer/symptoms-colorectal-cancer
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/colon-cancer/symptoms-causes/dxc-20188239
https://www.cancer.org/cancer/colon-rectal-cancer/causes-risks-prevention/prevention.html

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