CORONAVIRUS ALERT: Any symptoms of fever, cough, difficulty breathing AND travel to high risk areas(China, Italy, Iran and South Korea) in last 14 days or if you have been in close contact with someone who has traveled to these areas. NOTIFY YOUR PHYSICIAN IMMEDIATELY! 

After much consideration, and in an effort to protect the well-being of our community, we have made a decision to implement caregiver and visitor limitations at all MOH clinics that include:

  • No Visitors are allowed in the clinics
  • Only 1 caregiver can accompany a patient in the practice if they have no upper respiratory symptoms - upper respiratory symptoms include: a cough, fever of 101.1 and above, nasal congestion, runny nose or sore throat
  • Children age 15 or younger are not allowed in the clinic until further notice 

The health and safety of our MOH patients and staff is our top priority. We recognize that these visitor limitations may cause concerns, so if you feel you have a special circumstance, please notify the front desk so a manager can discuss your situation.Visitors with flu-like symptoms are not permitted to visit our offices in order to protect patients and staff.

The following offices, Wheaton and Germantown have consolidated to our Rockville & Bethesda locations. In addition, our Mt. Airy office has consolidated to our Frederick location.

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Hodgkin Lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma is a cancer that begins in cells  of the immune system. The immune system fights infections  and other diseases.

Hodgkin lymphoma can start almost anywhere. Usually, it's first found in a lymph node above the diaphragm, the thin muscle that separates the chest from the abdomen. But Hodgkin lymphoma also may be found in a group of lymph nodes. Sometimes it starts in other parts of the lymphatic system.

Hodgkin lymphoma begins when a lymphocyte (usually a B cell) becomes abnormal. The abnormal cell is called a Reed-Sternberg cell. (See photo below.)

The Reed-Sternberg cell divides to make copies of itself. The new cells divide again and again, making more and more abnormal cells. The abnormal cells don't die when they should. They don't protect the body from infections or other diseases. The buildup of extra cells often forms a mass of tissue called a growth or tumor.

Visit the National Cancer Institute where this information and more can be found about  Hodgkin Lymphoma or ask your cancer care team questions about your individual situation.

Lo que usted necesita saber sobre el linfoma de Hodgkin.