5 New Year’s Resolutions for Cancer Patients

Making and implementing New Year’s resolutions that can improve your lifestyle while undergoing cancer treatment can seem too difficult to tackle. But it can be done! Working towards maximizing your emotional and physical strength during this time is an excellent goal with long-term benefits.

There are several ways you can improve your lifestyle, helping you to better cope with the challenges involved in battling cancer. Here are five ideas and how you can incorporate them into your routine this new year.

1. Regular Exercise

For many cancer patients, the idea of following an exercise program while you’re going through cancer treatment is overwhelming. But even small amounts of exercise – such as walking around the block or 15 minutes of yoga – will provide long-term benefits.

According to the American Cancer Society, research shows that exercise is safe for most cancer patients. Planning exercise into your daily routine can help with how you feel physically and emotionally. Patients reported:

  • Better physical functioning
  • Less fatigue
  • Less anxiety

If you are undergoing chemotherapy or radiation therapy for cancer treatment, you should begin an exercise program at a lower intensity and build it gradually. The National Cancer Comprehensive Network urges patients to engage in a moderate workout program such as a daily walk combined with strength training using light weights. Moderate exercise is proven to boost immunity, which is essential for patients battling cancer.

If you regularly exercised before cancer treatment, try not to compare your current pace and workout intensity to what you used to do. Listen to your body and be as consistent as you can.

2. Engage in Meditation

Meditation is recommended for cancer patients because it helps manage anxiety, sleep problems, pain, high blood pressure, and fatigue. You can choose from several methods of meditation – a few examples are: mindfulness meditation, focused meditation, or prayerful meditation. Although side effects of these techniques are rare, experts say patients should inform their oncologist of any complementary therapies, such as meditation, before starting. There are resources for helping you learn how to meditate if this is something new to you. The Mindfulness Center and Hope Connections for Cancer Support, both in the Bethesda area, offer programs that can help you with understanding how to use meditation to produce benefits during and after cancer treatment.

3. Follow a Nutritious Diet

Food may not always sound good, or side effects of treatment can make it hard to eat. But taking in the right amount of calories is still really important for keeping up your strength and maintaining a healthy weight. What you eat while going through cancer treatment may be a little different from your typical diet, but try to keep it as nutritious as possible.

When possible, select healthy sources of fat including avocado, olive oil, nuts and fish such as salmon. Stay away from trans fats and foods high in cholesterol, such as processed snacks, fast food, and shortening. Here are a few suggestions that can help you with following a healthy diet during cancer treatment and beyond:

  • Eat protein every day. It will help you feel full, maintain your strength and rebuild tissue during your cancer treatments. This might include nuts, yogurt, cheese, or eggs.
  • The American Cancer Society suggests eating at least 2.5 cups of fruits and vegetables a day, including citrus fruits and dark-green and deep-yellow vegetables. Colorful vegetables and fruits and plant-based foods contain many natural health-promoting substances. During cancer treatment try to cook vegetables before eating them.
  • Use liquid meal replacements if it’s hard to get the right amount of nutrients every day. This is especially helpful if you have dry mouth.
  • Try eating smaller meals more often so that you can keep up your strength without feeling overly full. Keeping food in your stomach can also counter nausea.

If you find that some of your favorite foods don’t taste quite right during cancer treatment, that’s OK. Eat healthy foods that taste good and make sure to keep them stocked up in the house.

4. Cultivate an “Attitude of Gratitude”

Because of the mind-body connection, a grateful, positive attitude can make a decided difference in how you feel. Thankfulness helps people deal with adversity and is consistently linked to greater happiness. Cure Today magazine encourages cancer patients to find three things each day for which they are grateful. Write them down so you can revisit them when times are hard. This habit will grow stronger the more you engage in it.

5. Let Others Help You

You don’t often hear of resolutions that include “allowing others to help me.” But as a cancer survivor, this is something that you can commit to trying. It’s not only good for you but gives your family members and friends a way to feel like they are helping you. It can also help you avoid feelings of loneliness and isolation.

Allow loved ones to bring you a meal or stop by, even if your house isn’t in perfect order. Joining a cancer support group may also be helpful. These organizations offer the opportunity to share feelings with people who can understand and relate to your situation, and you can do the same for them. Studies show belonging to such groups makes cancer patients feel more hopeful and less anxious. They are available in person and online.

Maryland has an array of cancer support organizations, such as those offered by the Baltimore Cancer Support Group, Hope Connections for Cancer Support, The Mindfulness Center in Bethesda, and the Cancer Support Community. Your oncology team can put you in touch with those who can provide an additional list of cancer support groups available in the Maryland and Washington D.C. communities, even groups that might be for your specific type of cancer.

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Managing the Holidays with Cancer

Even people in perfect health often feel exhausted and overwhelmed during the holiday season; that feeling is often magnified when you’re battling cancer. You may not have the stamina to battle Black Friday crowds, deck the halls and entertain as lavishly as you have in years past, and that’s OK. If you’re a cancer patient try not to overexert yourself, but don’t isolate yourself either. Here are some ways cancer patients can manage and even enjoy the holidays while undergoing or recovering from cancer treatment.

Accept Help

When you were diagnosed with cancer and going through cancer treatment, you were probably inundated with offers of help and support. Now is the time to accept those offers. Whether you need help hanging Christmas lights or wrapping gifts, don’t hesitate to ask friends, neighbors and family members for help. Most people will feel honored that you asked, and you’ll probably enjoy both their help and their company.

Tweak Traditions

It’s easy to become caught up in the hustle and bustle of the holidays and become overwhelmed. This year, try to focus on the underlying reason for your traditions: Celebrating relationships and enjoying spending time with loved ones. If your tradition involves gathering the family for Christmas dinner, you can achieve that without spending hours in the kitchen. Ask each guest to bring a dish and have a pot-luck, have the meal catered, meet at one of the many wonderful restaurants in Maryland, or move the dinner to someone else’s house.

Let Your Fingers Do the Shopping

One of the most daunting aspects of the holidays is battling traffic and crowds to buy gifts. You certainly don’t have to buy gifts. However, if you want to consider shopping online. You’ll save time and energy, and you’ll probably also save money. Visit sites such as Retailmenot.comOffers.com, and freeshipping.org for online coupon codes. Another benefit of online shopping is that many sites offer a gift wrapping option. You can buy your gift and arrange to have it wrapped and shipped directly to your loved one.

Carve Out Time for Yourself

It’s easy to become overwhelmed during the holidays, so take care of yourself by taking breaks to recharge your batteries. Take a walk, take a bath, or take a nap. This is a good idea for cancer patients, even when it’s not the holidays. But it’s almost critical during the holiday season.

If it becomes clear the festivities will carry on into the wee hours, it’s OK to excuse yourself and make an early exit. If you’ve accepted an invitation but aren’t feeling well, feel free to send your regrets at the last minute. The holiday season is a marathon, not a sprint. Make your health top priority, and those around you will understand.

You Don’t Have to be Cheerful All the Time

When you have cancer, that fact is always on your mind. For most people, the holiday season is a time for reflection. As a cancer patient, it’s only natural that you’ll mourn your life before cancer and feel anxiety about the future. Anger, sadness and frustration are common, understandable emotions that don’t go away during the holidays. Express your feelings, as your honesty gives your loved ones permission to express their feelings, too. Cancer is a terrible disease, and it’s cathartic to acknowledge that. It’s OK to laugh and to cry.

Celebrate Life, Love and Happiness

You may have cancer, but cancer does not define you. Celebrate and enjoy your life. Whether you spend time with friends and loved ones, volunteer to help others or meditate in preparation for a brand new year, take time during the holiday season to celebrate all the wonderful things about your life, and know that our cancer specialist at Maryland Oncology Hematology are here to help you.

 

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Men: Are You at Risk For Prostate Cancer?

Every man and those who love him should know how to prevent prostate cancer. This is because a man is diagnosed with prostate cancer every three minutes. Fortunately, thanks to strides in cancer research and cancer clinical trials, this disease is often preventable and has a very high survival rate, if detected in the early stages.

Who is at a higher risk of getting prostate cancer?

Some men have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer, but that doesn’t seem that they will develop the disease. Also, it is possible that a man with several risk factors will never develop the disease.

These risk factors include:

  • Age

The chances of developing prostate cancer drastically increase when a man turns 50. However, over half the cancer cases are discovered in men who are 65 or older. It is rare for a male under the age of 40 to develop prostate cancer; however, it can happen.

  • Genetics and Family History

Most prostate cancer occur in men without a family history, but there are some links that suggest their are inherited factors in developing prostate cancer. Discuss your family medical history with your doctor to help determine if you should have a genetic cancer risk assessment. If you have a family history of prostate cancer or many of the risk factors be sure talk to your doctor about things you can do to lower your risks.

  • Geographic Location

North Americans have a slightly higher risk than men in many other parts of the world. The reasons for this are still unknown, but are believed to be related to the more advanced screening methods in the United States.

  • Race

Race is another factor; your chances of dying from prostate cancer are over two times higher if you are a Caribbean man of African descent or African-American male. Studies indicate that this is because a high majority of African-American males have one or two copies of a genetic variant, which is a variation in the DNA sequence of their genomes. Also making them more than two-times more likely to die from the disease than white men.

It is best to be aware of risk factors and seek help with your doctor if you notice any abnormal changes.

How do you lower your risk of prostate cancer?

The success in treating prostate cancer has also provided more knowledge on how to lower our risks of prostate cancer. While there are many factors, such as genes, age and race, that we aren’t able to control; there are a few factors that we can control to help lower risks, including:

  • Schedule a physical with your doctor each year. This is important because the beginning stages of prostate cancer have few or no symptoms. An annual physical can help detect the disease in the earliest stages.
  • Eating a healthy diet that includes at least 2.5 cups of fruits and vegetables each day. Vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, tomatoes, and cauliflower are especially good.
  • Avoiding obesity by keeping your body at a healthy weight.
  • Exercising on a regular basis.
  • Avoid smoking, or quit if you already smoke.
  • Talk to your doctor. If you feel that you are at a greater risk to develop prostate cancer, talk to your doctor about additional vitamins, mineral, or medications that you can take to help lower your risks.

Talk to your healthcare provider about what’s best for you and to schedule your yearly prostate cancer screening. However, increased urination or a weaker flow of urine can be signs of advanced prostate cancer, and while these problems can also be caused by other problems that have nothing to do with cancer, we recommend making an appointment to see your doctor about these symptoms. There are tests can detect prostate cancer in its earliest stages, whether or not you have any symptoms. If the test result is abnormal, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you have the disease. Your doctor will conduct other tests to find out for sure.

For help with this disease in the Maryland and Washington, D.C., area, contact us to make an appointment with one of our prostate cancer specialists. Our staff members are up-to-date on the latest clinical trials and cancer research and will help you choose the best treatment option to successfully battle this disease.

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What Is Head and Neck Cancer?

Head and neck cancers, as you may have guessed, affect areas of the head and neck. These cancers aren’t common (they account for about 3% of all malignant cancers in the United States). And, according to the National Cancer Institute, head and neck cancer diagnosis have been declining for decades. So have mortality rates.

Continue reading “What Is Head and Neck Cancer?”

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4 Questions to Ask Before Joining a Cancer Research Trial

Have you wondered whether there might be a new or different cancer treatment option available to you through cancer research trials? Or maybe your doctor has talked to you about the possibility of participating in a clinical trial for your cancer treatment. (Read more to understand “What is a Clinical Trial?”) Here are four things that patients and family members should feel free to ask their oncologist and research team before agreeing to participate.

Continue reading “4 Questions to Ask Before Joining a Cancer Research Trial”

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A Cancer Survivor’s Guide to Returning to Work

Chances are you or a coworker will face the question of returning to work after cancer treatment. Cancer now affects 1 in 2 women and 1 in 3 men, while the survival rate for many cancers is increasing.

While the risk of cancer increases with age, it also affects many younger adults still in the workplace. An estimated 46% of patients diagnosed with cancer are between the ages of 20 and 64.

Surveys find that most cancer survivors who return to work say that it’s beneficial for their recovery. In addition to needing the income, you may enjoy using your skills and maintaining personal relationships.

For some cancer survivors, it’s gratifying just to have experiences apart from their medical condition.

Your individual needs will depend on many factors, including your specific diagnosis.

Use these suggestions to help you deal with health and career issues if you’re considering going back to work after cancer treatment.

Protecting Your Health:

  1. Follow up. It’s important to follow your doctor’s recommendations for aftercare. Let your doctor’s office know if you need to arrange appointments and medications in a way that will have the least impact on your job.
  2. Manage stress. Some cancer patients experience depression and anxiety, in addition to the usual job-related stress. Find relaxation practices that work for you like meditation and physical exercise.
  3. Seek support. Be willing to accept assistance. Tell your family, friends, and coworkers what you need. Reach out to other cancer patients or call your local hospital to find a support group near you.
  4. Understand your rights. There are several government programs and policies that may help you make the transition back to work, including the Americans with Disability Act and the Family Medical Leave Act. Ask your HR department or contact a social worker or advocacy group for more information.
  5. Guard your privacy. You also have the right to keep your medical information confidential if you wish. Many employers are supportive, but you may sometimes face discrimination. Let your doctor know if you want to avoid any reference to cancer when they fill out forms from your employer.

cancer survivors guide

Readjusting to Work:

  1. Stay in touch. Returning to the office will be easier if you can find ways to stay involved during your treatment. Maybe you can attend some meetings or read industry publications. Maybe you have an office buddy you can call occasionally.
  2. Prepare for questions. You may find that some colleagues are eager to welcome you back while others seem uncomfortable. Rehearse what you want to say about your condition or your time away, so you’ll be ready with a response that works for you.
  3. Reduce your hours. Part-time work is one of the simplest ways to transition back gradually. Many cancer patients experience fatigue, so respect your limits.
  4. Ask for accommodations. Evaluate your workspace and usual tasks. Talk with your employer about modifications that can help you to do your job. For example, you might need to keep your office scent-free to avoid triggering nausea.
  5. Write things down. Some of your symptoms may have more to do with the side effects of your treatment rather than cancer itself. If chemotherapy affects your concentration, make written notes to remind you of any details you might forget.
  6. Change jobs. You may still be able to work even if your current position poses difficulties for your recovery. Research other fields or apply for jobs with less demanding responsibilities.

With skillful communication and planning, you may be able to continue working after your cancer treatment. Talk with your doctor to ensure that you’re well enough to do your job and work with your employer to make any necessary adjustments.

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