Maryland Oncology Hematology Welcomes Colette Magnant, MD, FACS to Their Expanding Breast Surgical Oncology Team

Dr. Magnant joins Dr. Surupa Sen Gupta at their Rockville Division to offer the community advanced surgical care with the latest breast preservation techniques.

Maryland Oncology Hematology  (MOH), the largest independent oncology practice in Maryland and a member of The US Oncology Network, is proud to announce that Dr. Colette Magnant, MD, FACS is joining its Rockville division.

Dr. Magnant has been treating breast cancer for over 34 years and has established herself as one of the premier breast cancer surgeons in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area.  With her extensive training and wealth of experience, she provides her patients with a superior understanding of breast cancer biology, as well as compassionate state of the art breast preservation procedures, and advanced surgical techniques. She will be joining Dr. Surupa Sen Gupta to expand our breast surgical oncology services at our Rockville division, and together they, along with our expert and experienced medical oncologists, will anchor our comprehensive breast cancer program in the Rockville division.

‘We’re thrilled to welcome Dr. Magnant  to our experienced breast surgical team. Her stellar reputation as a top breast surgeon is well-deserved and we are fortunate that she has decided to bring her skills to our practice and to our community.  She shares our vision of providing state-of-the-art multidisciplinary cancer care, and we are delighted to have her join in our expansion said George Sotos MD, Managing Partner, Rockville Division. ‘With her focus and strong surgical experience in breast cancer treatment, Dr. Magnant is a welcome addition to our team as we dedicate our practice to delivering the very best in comprehensive and integrated care to our breast cancer patients.

Dr. Magnant is board certified in general surgery, specializing in advanced breast surgery techniques, including skin and nipple-sparing mastectomies and minimally invasive breast conserving surgeries. After earning her medical degree from the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond, Dr. Magnant completed her general surgery internship at Indiana University Medical Center and her residency at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, DC. She is most recently the past director of the Sullivan Center for Breast Health at Sibley Hospital, as well as an assistant professor at John Hopkins University. In addition to teaching, Dr. Magnant has made numerous media appearances and delivered dozens of university lectures.

‘I’m proud to work alongside the dynamic team at Maryland Oncology Hematology, said Dr. Magnant. ‘We’re dedicated to delivering compassionate and comprehensive breast health services to the surrounding community, allowing our patients to receive the best of care, close to home.

Dr. Magnant will be joining Dr. Sen Gupta who is board certified in general surgery, fellowship trained in breast surgical oncology, and specializes in minimally invasive breast-conserving surgeries.

Dr. Magnant will start seeing patients at MOH’s Rockville office on April 1st. Appointments are available for newly referred patients to provide a high level of support and easy access to care. Please call 301.424.6231 to make an appointment.

About Maryland Oncology Hematology

Maryland Oncology Hematology (MOH) is the largest independent oncology practice in the state of Maryland, with more than 45 practicing clinicians devoted exclusively to providing comprehensive, compassionate, and high-quality cancer care. MOH specializes in medical, gynecologic, hematology, cancer genetic risk assessment, clinical trials and research, and patient ancillary programs. MOH believes it is beneficial to provide cancer therapies in a community setting, close to patients’ homes and support systems. The physicians are supported by a talented clinical team sensitive to the needs of cancer patients and their caregivers. For more information, visit MarylandOncology.com.

About US Oncology Network

Maryland Oncology Hematology is a practice in The US Oncology Network  (The Network). This collaboration unites the practice with more than 1,380 independent physicians dedicated to delivering value-based, integrated care to patients — close to home. Through The Network, these independent doctors come together to form a community of shared expertise and resources dedicated to advancing local cancer care and to delivering better patient outcomes. The Network is supported by McKesson Corporation , whose coordinated resources and infrastructure allow doctors in The Network to focus on the health of their patients, while McKesson focuses on the health of their practices. MOH also participates in clinical trials through US Oncology Research, which has played a role in more than 100 FDA-approved cancer therapies.

 

Media Contact
Company Name: Maryland Oncology Hematology
Contact Person: Mark W Lamplugh Jr
Email: Send Email
Phone: 5617629729
Country: United States
Website: https://mdoncology.wpengine.com

 

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The Rise of Colorectal Cancer in Young Adults

A study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute  made headlines for its startling and mysterious conclusion: The incidence of colorectal cancer in young adults has increased sharply in generations born after 1950. Individuals born in the 1990s (currently age 18 to 27) are twice as likely to develop colon cancer and four times as likely to develop rectal cancer than individuals born in the 1950s were at those ages.

Why is this type of cancer suddenly on the rise in younger adults? No one knows for certain. Researchers suspect changes in diet, more sedentary lifestyles, and obesity could be contributing factors. Another theory is that cancers are simply being detected much earlier than in past decades.

What Is Colorectal Cancer?

Colorectal cancer refers to cancer that begins in the colon or rectum, which together make up the large intestine. Sometimes they are referred to individually as colon cancer or rectal cancer. Most colorectal cancers begin with a polyp that develops on the inner lining of the colon or rectum. The two primary types of polyps are adenomas, which are most likely to become cancer, and hyperplastic and inflammatory polyps, which are more common but far less likely to become cancerous.

Polyps are common in people age 50 and older. Most aren’t cancerous. If a polyp does become cancerous, cancer cells can eventually spread to the wall of the colon or rectum. From there, they can spread to the blood or lymph vessels of the colon or rectum and eventually spread to lymph nodes and metastasize throughout the body.

Colorectal Cancer: Signs and Symptoms

As with many cancers, colorectal cancers sometimes occur with minimal — or no — symptoms. More often than not, though, this cancer is associated with telltale signs. If you know what to watch for, you’ll know if and when it’s time to schedule a colorectal screening to rule out cancer. If you develop any of the following symptoms, consult your doctor right away. It’s better to be safe than sorry!

Any indication of blood on or in the stool.
Rectal bleeding.
Unexplained anemia.
Cramps, gas or unusual stomach pain that persists.
Unexplained weight loss.
Vomiting.
Fatigue.
Constipation, diarrhea, bowel incontinence or other unusual bowel habits.
Feeling that your bowel isn’t emptying completely.

How to Reduce Your Risk of Developing Colorectal Cancer

According to the American Cancer Society, there is no way to definitively prevent colon cancer — or most cancers, for that matter. Some of the main risk factors for developing colorectal cancer — family history, advanced age and history of inflammatory bowel disease — aren’t within your control.

Others risk factors are within your control. Doctors recommend taking the following steps to reduce your risks:

Maintaining a healthy weight and avoiding excess weight around your midsection.
Participating in regular moderate exercise.
Increasing your intake of fruits and vegetables and limiting red and processed meats.
Avoiding excess alcohol consumption.
Quitting smoking.

Screening Is The Most Powerful Preventive Tool

Arguably, the most effective way to reduce the likelihood that you’ll develop colorectal cancer is to undergo regular colorectal cancer screening to detect cancerous or precancerous cells in the absence of other symptoms.

It takes about a decade for precancerous cells to form polyps. Screenings can detect precancerous polyps, so they can be removed before they become cancerous, and can detect cancerous polyps early when the cancer is curable.

Colorectal screening methods include fecal blood tests and colonoscopy. During a colonoscopy, a flexible tube with a viewing lens and tissue removal tool is inserted into the colon. A physician checks the colon lining for growths and can remove any abnormal growths detected.

Current guidelines recommend that most individuals consider a screening colonoscopy at age 50 — earlier for those with a family history of the disease talk to your physician about the best choice for your situation.

Sources:


https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/djw322
http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/02/28/517563769/why-are-more-young-americans-getting-colon-cancer
http://www.webmd.com/colorectal-cancer/symptoms-colorectal-cancer
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/colon-cancer/symptoms-causes/dxc-20188239
https://www.cancer.org/cancer/colon-rectal-cancer/causes-risks-prevention/prevention.html

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What are Complementary Therapies, and What Can They Do for Cancer Patients?

Complementary therapies are products and/or practices that differ from standard medical care provided by your oncologists. These non-traditional methods are in no way meant to replace cancer treatment. They’re called complementary because they are meant to work alongside your cancer treatment in hopes of relieving symptoms and side effects, relieving pain, and improving quality of life.

Complementary therapies typically concentrate on relaxation and reducing stress. Many of these types of therapies may help calm emotions, relieve anxiety, reduce nausea, minimize pain, provide extra energy, and increase overall health and well being.

Many cancer patients feel as though complementary therapies leave them with a little more control over their health as they go through cancer treatment. They also tend to appreciate that complementary therapies do not require additional medicines. When the symptoms and side effects of your cancer treatment are difficult to cope with, these alternative approaches can be supportive in bringing relief. Before adding any complementary therapy to your current treatment, however, it is important to talk with your cancer specialist.

There are many different types of complementary therapy. Be sure to tell your therapist or instructor that you are a cancer patient before you start any complementary therapy. This is important information that could impact what they recommend for you.

Complementary therapies include, but are not limited to:

  • Aromatherapy and Essential Oils: The use of essential oils either by inhalation or topical application. Oils can aid in reducing anxiety, nausea, depression, and pain. Be sure you receive instruction before applying any oils to your skin.
  • Acupuncture: The practice of applying needles, heat, pressure, and other treatments to one or more places on the skin known as acupuncture points. It can be effective for cancer treatment side effects such as nausea and vomiting, pain, and fatigue.
  • Chiropractic: A chiropractor can provide hands-on manipulation of the spine (adjustment) that can help with stresses cancer treatment has put on the musculoskeletal system, which can increase mobility, flexibility, strength, and function. It may also help relieve nausea, fatigue, headaches, and other body pains in the back and neck area.
  • Herbal supplements: May help strengthen the immune system and ease the side effects of cancer treatment. These can interact with medicines being used for cancer treatment and should always be discussed with your cancer care team before using.
  • Massage therapy: A hands-on method of manipulating the soft tissues of the body that can promote relaxation and help with pain, fatigue, immune function.
  • Guided Imagery (Visualization): A technique that focuses and directs the imagination toward a specific goal. Practicing this may be able to reduce feelings of depression and increase feelings of well-being. The University of Michigan provides a free guided imagery audio library.
  • Art or music therapy: Creative arts that promote a better quality of life by aiding in the reduction of depression, anxiety, and pain. It can also be a positive outlet for emotional expression.
  • Yoga: Yoga connects the mind and body through movement and meditation. Yoga can help improve quality of life by relieving both physical and emotional stress.
  • Support groups: Group meetings can help cancer patients cope. Having emotional support can help improve both quality of life and survival.

In most cases, cancer doctors are very supportive of their patients using complementary therapies. This is typically because they have seen people cope better with the cancer and its treatment.

Again, it isn’t recommended that complementary therapies replace cancer treatment. They are simply meant to be used in conjunction with the current cancer treatment. Talking with your cancer specialist can help find the right balance between the complementary therapies and traditional treatments you are receiving for your cancer. Our oncologist at Maryland Oncology Hematology are able to talk you through these complementary cancer therapies, as well as additional methods of therapy that may be best for your cancer care. If you are in Maryland or the Washington D.C. area, you can schedule a consultation by picking the Maryland Oncology Hematology location that’s most convenient to you and calling to make an appointment.

Sources:

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Weather Update 2/19/2021

Check our 2/19/2021 weather update page for practice closures and operating hour changes for tomorrow. All recent updates will be added or changed as offices make decisions. If your office isn’t listed, then no changes have be made yet. Feel free to call your office with any questions regarding appointments. Check this page for updates throughout the evening and tomorrow.

Columbia office will be open normal business hours. 

Capital division which includes Silver Spring White Oak Cancer Center & Laurel will be open normal hours.

Our Southern division which includes Brandywine & Lanham will be open 1 hour late on 2/19/2021

Our Frederick division which included our Frederick & Mt Airy office will open at 10AM 2/19/2021

Rockville Division which includes Rockville – Aquilino Cancer Center, Germantown and Bethesda will be open at 10AM on  2/19/2021

 

Annapolis will open at 10AM on 2/19/2021 due to the weather.

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6 Surprising Signs and Symptoms of Breast Cancer

For American women, breast cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer after skin cancer. On average, one in eight women and one in 1,000 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer during their lifetime.

Thanks to breast cancer awareness initiatives launched by charities including Susan G. Komen for the Cure and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, most U.S. women and men know that if they, or a loved one, discover a lump in their breast, they should be screened for breast cancer. You may be surprised to learn there’s a type of breast cancer called inflammatory breast cancer, accounting for less than 5% of all cases, that doesn’t develop a lump. Instead, this type of cancer blocks the lymph vessels, causing fluids to back up and generating unusual symptoms including persistent breast itching, nipple discharge, and a mark that looks like an insect bite that doesn’t go away.

Beyond the Lump: Lesser Known Breast Cancer Warning Signs

The more familiar you become with your breasts, the more likely you’ll be to notice changes. While lumps sometimes form deep within breast tissue (meaning in the early stages they can only be detected by a mammogram), other breast cancer red flags occur on the surface of the breast. They’re easily detectable – if you know what to look for. Here are six symptoms to watch for. If you detect one or more, you should be evaluated as soon as possible by a qualified physician.

  1. Warm, red, irritated and/or itchy breasts. These are among the most common early warning signs of inflammatory breast cancer.
  2. Nipple discharge. With the exception of breast milk that may leak from breasts during or after pregnancy, any nipple discharge should be checked by a doctor. Clear or bloody discharge may indicate cancer.
  3. Flat or inverted nipple. If this is unusual for you, have it evaluated by a doctor.
  4. Scaliness. Healthy breast skin is smooth. If yours is scaly or inflamed, that’s a red flag.
  5. Changes in skin texture. If you develop a rash, puckering or dimpling on the breast, that could be a sign of breast cancer. Skin changes related to breast cancer may resemble the rough skin of an orange peel.
  6. Change in breast size or shape. While it’s not uncommon for someone to have one breast that’s larger than the other, any new change in breast size or shape, including swelling or shrinkage, could indicate cancer.
Breast cancer awareness. Woman in pink bra holding a pink ribbon, a reminder of the importance of breast examination in healthcare and medicine, to maintain and sustain a cancer-free, healthy lifestyle.

What’s Normal?

Knowing what breast cancer red flags to watch for is important, but so is knowing about breast changes that may be completely normal. Throughout a women’s menstrual cycle, periodic breast pain, tenderness and heaviness is common. If you experience these feelings in both breasts, and are menstruating or about to begin your cycle, these symptoms are most likely the result of normal, monthly hormonal changes in your body. For more information about what’s normal and what’s not, check the blog about common breast cancer myths.

When in Doubt, Get Checked Out

If you’re experiencing any of the symptoms mentioned above, or if you’re having pain at times other than the start of your menstrual cycle, it would be a good idea to talk to your doctor about getting a mammogram. There’s no need to panic. Schedule an appointment with your gynecologist, who will typically examine you and then refer you for a mammogram. Mammograms effectively detect 84% of breast cancers; so when you’re given a clean bill of health you can set your mind at ease. If your mammogram detects a suspicious mass, you may need to be evaluated further. If you do have breast cancer, you can expect a better outcome, because the earlier cancer treatment begins, the better patient outcomes usually are. If you live in Maryland, Washington, D.C. or the surrounding areas and want to be examined by a breast cancer specialist, contact us at Maryland Oncology Hematology.

Sources:

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/understand_bc/statistics

 https://thetruthaboutcancer.com/5-early-warning-breast-cancer-signs

http://www.nationalbreastcancer.org/breast-cancer-symptoms-and-signs

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Weather Update 2/2/2021

Due to weather our Frederick & Mt Airy offices will be opening 10AM on 2/2/2021. If you have questions regarding rescheduling, you can reach our Frederick office at 301-695-6777 and Mt Airy at 301-829-0707.

Mt Airy: https://mdoncology.wpengine.com/locations…/locations/mt-airy/

Frederick: https://mdoncology.wpengine.com/locatio…/locations/frederick/

Due to weather our Columbia office will be opening at 10:00AM with 2Hr delay. If you have questions regarding rescheduling, you can reach our Columbia office at 410-964-2212

Columbia: Columbia | Maryland Oncology Hematology

 

Due to weather our Rockville, Germantown and Bethesda offices will be opening 2 hr delay on 2/2/2021. If you have questions regarding rescheduling, please call your office at  301-424-6231

Rockville: Rockville – Aquilino Cancer Center | Maryland Oncology Hematology

Bethesda: Bethesda | Maryland Oncology Hematology

Germantown: Germantown | Maryland Oncology Hematology

All other offices are operating as usual.

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The Importance of Genetic Testing in Cancer Research

It’s common for cancer patients and their families to feel helpless, as if their futures and those of their loved ones are entirely dependent on physicians and medications. Genetic testing is one way for cancer patients and their relatives to regain a sense of control over the horrible disease, and make a valuable contribution toward improving cancer detection, new cancer treatments and understanding cancer prevention methods.

One of the most effective ways for cancer researchers to learn why a type of cancer occurs (an important step in discovering new cancer treatments) is to study the genes of cancer patients and those who share their DNA profile.

How is Genetic Testing used to Advance Cancer Research?

When researchers study the genes from a large sampling of individuals who have or are susceptible to certain cancers, they’re able to detect patterns, or genetic markers. This information can be used to predict the likelihood that someone will develop a disease, as well as to develop cancer screening tests, prevention protocols and various cancers treatments.

Because of cancer genetic testing, researchers from the National Cancer Institute’s Division of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetics (DCEG) have made important discoveries that have advanced cancer research and cancer treatment. For example:

  • Researchers studying the genes of a patient with nevoid basal-cell carcinoma syndrome identified the gene responsible for the skin cancer. That finding culminated in the first U.S. Food & Drug Administration-approved biological agent therapy for advanced and metastatic basal cell skin cancer.
  • Researchers studying breast cancer patients’ genes discovered that a gene mutation on the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene increases the likelihood of developing the disease. Today, people who discover they have this gene have the option of choosing elective mastectomies to reduce their risks of breast cancer.
  • Researchers studying the genes of dyskeratosis congenita patients discovered that 60 percent have the same genetic mutation. That finding led to a new diagnostic test for the disease and new criteria for evaluating potential bone-marrow donors.
  • Researchers studying monoclonal B-cell lymphomatosis patients discovered that the disease is a precursor for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). That finding paved the way for screening tests now used to diagnosis CLL in its early stages, which allows patients to begin treatment before the disease advances.

The research continues. DCEG researchers are currently conducting several studies, including:

  • Studies of melanoma-prone families to search for “melanoma susceptibility” genes.
  • Studies of patients with a group of rare genetic blood disorders known as inherited bone marrow failure syndromes to learn how these cancers develop.
  • Studies of children with a rare lung tumor, pleuropulmonary blastoma, to determine if changes in a particular gene contribute to this lung cancer.

Genetic testing isn’t foolproof, but it is a powerful tool for cancer patients who want to contribute to science, and individuals who want to assess their risks.

How Is Genetic Testing Conducted?

Most physicians require a patient to undergo genetic counseling before undergoing genetic testing for cancer because the results of your cancer genetic test may yield unwelcome news, and patients should be prepared.

In most cases, the process of undergoing genetic testing is surprisingly simple and painless. Typically, the person being tested provides either:

  • A blood sample (usually several tubes taken from a vein in your arm)
  • A sample of DNA obtained from saliva, skin cells or cheek cells (obtained by swabbing the inside of the cheek)
  • Genetic testing for a fetus may require the mother to have an amniocentesis, although non-invasive prenatal tests are also available

The sample is sent to a genetic testing laboratory for analysis, where they will determine your sample to be positive, negative or inconclusive. Within two – three weeks, the detailed results will be sent to the physician of genetic counselor who ordered the testing.

Can anyone be Candidate for Cancer Research Genetic Testing?

Genetic testing leads to genetic screening tests. Individuals with family histories of certain types of cancer (such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer, colon cancer, and others) who are interested in learning if they possess a certain hereditary gene mutation — and who are mentally prepared for the possibility of a positive result — are candidates for genetic testing.

Features suggestive of hereditary cancers include:

  • Any individual diagnosed with cancer prior to age 50
  • Any individual who has developed more than one cancer
  • Any individual with a rare type of cancer (ovarian, male breast cancer, pancreatic)
  • An individual with two or more family members diagnosed with the same cancer
  • A family member with an identifiable gene mutation known to increase the risk of cancer
  • Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry with a personal or family history of  cancer

Individuals who already have cancer and want to contribute to research that could lead to advances in detection and treatments are also candidates.

If you or someone in your family thinks they need to have cancer genetic testing performed, it is important to review our Genetic Risk Assessment section with your doctor or genetic counselor, or if you are located in the Maryland or Washington DC area, schedule an appointment with the Maryland Oncology Hematology team for a more in depth discussion.

Sources:

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Linda M. Burrell, M.D. Announces Retirement January 29, 2021

Maryland Oncology Hematology is sad to announce that Dr. Linda Burrell will be retiring from practice effective January 29, 2021.   Dr. Burrell has been a pillar of our organization and has provided exceptional patient care to our community for over three decades.  Her clinical excellence and fierce dedication to her patients has established her as one of the leading physicians in our region with Dr. Burrell being recognized as a Top Doctor by Washingtonian Magazine.  More importantly, as you will often hear from her patients, she has set the benchmark for what it means to offer compassionate care in the most difficult of times.

We at Maryland Oncology Hematology will always value Dr. Burrell for her many contributions to our organization. Her hard work, commitment and dedication set an example for all of those around her. While we will miss her greatly, we know that she will continue to be an example we can all follow in both our professional and personal lives. She has made each of us better as individuals and our organization is now a better place because she was a part of it.  She is an irreplaceable member of our team and we all thank her for her years of service.

All of us at Maryland Oncology Hematology look forward to continuing the incredible legacy Dr. Burrell has established in our community. For her existing patients, Dr. Burrell will be coordinating transition of your care.  For her referring physicians, our group will be happy to provide care for your new patient referrals.  Our entire team of physicians and administrators are ready to assist in any way possible and to answer any questions you may have.

Please join us as we celebrate Dr. Burrell and her many accomplishments and wish her well as she begins this next chapter!

 

Thank You,

The Maryland Oncology Hematology Team

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